Blogosphere

Everything you always wanted to know about language but were too afraid to ask

MPI Nijmegen

The MPI in Nijmegen: the origin of answers to your questions.

The Max Planck Institute in Nijmegen has started a great initiative which tries nothing less than answer all your questions about language. How does it work?

1) Go to this website: http://www.mpi.nl/q-a/questions-and-answers
2) See whether your question has already been answered
3) If not, scroll to the bottom and ask a question yourself.
The answers are not provided by just anybody but by language researchers themselves. Before they are put on the web they get checked by another researcher and they get translated into German, Dutch and English. It’s a huge enterprise, to be sure..
As an employee of the Max Planck Institute I’ve had my own go at answering a few questions:
- How does manipulating through language work?
- Is it true that people who are good in music can learn a language sooner?
- How do gender articles affect cognition?
.What do think of my answers? What questions would you like to see answered?

 

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Thibodeau, P., & Boroditsky, L. (2011). Metaphors We Think With: The Role of Metaphor in Reasoning PLoS ONE, 6 (2) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0016782

Asaridou, S., & McQueen, J. (2013). Speech and music shape the listening brain: evidence for shared domain-general mechanisms Frontiers in Psychology, 4 DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00321

Segel, E., & Boroditsky, L. (2011). Grammar in Art Frontiers in Psychology, 1 DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2010.00244

 

ResearchBlogging.org

The ironic effect of German PhD prestige

What would happen if a culture actually believed that a PhD does confer such a great set of transferable skills and is such an important test of character that the title is a career boost? A look at Germany gives an impression but it is not the science policy heaven one might expect.

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Schavan, Doktor, German science minister, doctor

By now she is just Schavan, ex-science minister.

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There can be no doubt that a PhD is associated with career boost in Germany. Just look at numbers like these: in 2005 in the US 6% of CEOs had a PhD, in France it was 4%. In Germany, however, the number was a full 59%. Note that this is not because more than half of the university graduates who leave German universities do so with a PhD in hand. Only 11% do. Actual pay mirrors this pattern. With merely a university diploma a female graduate gets nearly a third less pay than her PhD colleague.The message to ambitious people is clear: get that PhD no matter what career you want to pursue.
Moreover, having a German PhD is more than just a boost to one’s career. It is a boost to one’s entire social standing. Once the title is obtained it will cover one’s doorbell, one’s business card and even one’s passport. One will expect to be addressed with this title. In many respects it has become the modern equivalent of a title of nobility.
At first, this may sound like science policy heaven. There is a country where people who have earned scientific qualifications have got such a high social standing that they easily reach the highest ladders of society. The claims of transferable skills, test of character, training in critical thinking and analysis, … There is seemingly no need to convince Germans of these things, no need to do advertisements for science education, it appears. However, the opposite could be true. People who want to reach the highest ladders of society are clogging up the scientific training process. They have their career in mind, not scientific progress.
Merkel, zu Guttenberg

He was defense secretary and had a PhD. She is chancellor and has a PhD.

This leads to unintended consequences. A year ago, the German defense secretary (Dr) zu Guttenberg was about to lose his PhD title for plagiarism and consequently stepped down. Now, the German science minister (Prof. Dr) Schavan was forced to resign for the same reason. In between, a list of other German politicians was also found out. When prestige is more important than scientific value, the latter will obviously suffer. In this context the list of people with faulty PhDs at the highest levels of politics is hardly surprising.
What needs to change is a view that people with a PhD are somehow better people. At heart, a PhD is just a vocational qualification for science, a necessary step for pursuing a career in research or academia. It says nothing about the general quality of a person, or as Chris Chambers put it: ‘almost everyone who starts a PhD and sticks around long enough ends up getting one’. Of course you learn transferable skills while doing a PhD, but this does not mean that a PhD should be seen as a condition for having a business or politics career.
Paradoxically, everyone involved might actually benefit from less prestigious academic titles in the long run. Professors would be less bothered by PhD students who are not interested in research. The research literature would be less clogged up with easily obtained but uninteresting findings. And career minded graduates would not be required to spend years of their lives developing research skills which will perhaps not be needed in their later business or politics careers.
Now, how do you reduce the prestige of academic titles? There is no better way than to expose people in power who obtained them without actually deserving them. Thanks Dr zu Guttenberg and Prof. Dr Schavan.

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Figures:

1) via stabroeknews.com

2) By Bundeswehr-Fotos [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Correcting for Human Researchers – The Rediscovery of Replication

We need to control for this.

You may have missed some of the discussion on fraud, errors and biases shaking the scientific community of late, so I will quickly bring you up to speed.
Firstly, a series of fraud cases (Ruggiero, Hauser, Stapel) in Psychology and related fields makes everyone wonder why only internal whistleblowers ever discover major fraud cases like these.
Secondly, a well regarded journal publishes an article by Daryl Bem (2011) claiming that we can feel the future. Wagenmakers et al. (2011) apply a different statistical analysis and claim that Bem’s evidence for precognition is so weak as to be meaningless. The debate continues. Meanwhile a related failed replication paper claims to have trouble getting published.
Thirdly, John Bargh criticises everyone involved in a failed replication of an effect he is particularly well known for. He criticises the experimenters, the journal, even a blogger who wrote about it.
This all happened within the last year and suddenly everyone speaks about replication. Ed Yong wrote about it in nature, the Psychologist had a special issue on it, some researchers set up a big replication project, the blogosphere goes crazy with it.
Some may wonder why replication was singled out as the big issue. Isn’t this about the ruthless, immoral energy of fraudsters? Or about publishers’ craving for articles that create buzz? Or about a researcher’s taste for scandal? Perhaps it is indeed about a series of individual problems related to human nature. But the solution is still a systemic one: replication. It is the only way of overcoming the unfortunate fact that science is only done by mere humans.
This may surprise some people because replication is not done all that much. And the way researchers get rewarded for their work totally goes against doing replications. The field carries on as if there were procedures, techniques and analyses that overcome the need for replication. The most common of which is inferential hypothesis testing.
This way of analysing your data simply asks whether any differences found among the people who were studied would hold up in the population at large. If so, the difference is said to be a ‘statistically significant’ difference. Usually, this is boiled down to a p-value which reports the likelihood of finding the same statistically significant difference again and again in experiment after experiment if in truth the difference didn’t exist at all in the population. So, imagine that women and men in truth were equally intelligent (I have no idea whether they are). Inferential hypothesis testing predicts that 5% of experiments will report a significant difference between male and female IQs. This difference won’t be replicated by the other 95% of experiments.
And this is where replication comes in: the p-value can be thought of as a prediction of how likely failed replications of an effect will be. Needless to say that a prediction is a poor substitute for the real thing.
This was brought home to me by Luck in his great book An Introduction to the Event-Related Potential Technique (2005, p. 251). He basically says that replication is the only approach in science which is not based on assumptions needed to run the aforementioned statistical analyses.
Replication does not depend on assumptions about normality, sphericity, or independence. Replication is not distorted by outliers. Replication is a cornerstone of science. Replication is the best statistic.
In other words, it is the only way of overcoming the human factor involved in choosing how to get to a p-value. You can disagree on many things, but not on the implication of a straight replication. If the effect is consistently replicated, it is real.
For example, Simmons and colleagues (2011) report that researchers can tweak their data easily without anyone knowing. This is not really fraud but it is not something you want to admit, either. Using four ways of tweaking the statistical analysis towards a significant result – which is desirable for publication – resulted in a statistically significant difference having a non-replication likelihood of 60%. Now, this wouldn’t be a problem if anyone actually bothered to do a replication – including the exact same tweaks to the data. It is very likely that the effect wouldn’t hold up.
Many people believe that this is what really happened with Bem’s pre-cognition results. They are perhaps not fraudulous, but the way they were analysed and reported inflated the chances of finding effects which are not real. Similarly, replication is what did not happen with Stapel and other fraudsters. My guess is that if anyone had actually bothered to replicate, it would have become clear that Stapel has a history of unreplicability (see my earlier blog post about the Stapel affair for clues).
So, if we continue to let humans do research, we have to address the weakness inherent in this approach. Replication is the only solution we know of.
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Bem, D.J., Feeling the Future: Experimental Evidence for Anomalous Retroactive Influences on Cognition and Affect. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100, 407-425. DOI: 10.1037/a0021524
Luck, S.J. (2005). An Introduction to the Event-Related Potential Technique. London: MIT Press.
Simmons, J.P., Nelson, L.D., Simonsohn, U. (2011). False Positive Psychology: Undisclosed Flexibility in Data Collection and Analysis Allows Presenting Anything as Significant. Psychological Science, 22, 1359-1366. DOI: 10.1177/0956797611417632
Wagenmakers, E.J., Wetzels, R., Borsboom, D., van der Maas, H. (2011). Why Psychologists Must Change the Way They Analyze Their Data: The Case of Psi. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100, 426-432. doi: 10.1037/a0022790