How to test for music skills

In a new article I evaluate a recently developed test for music listening skills. To my great surprise the test behaves very well. This could open the path to better understand the psychology underlying music listening. Why am I surprised?

I got my first taste of how difficult it is to replicate published scientific results during my very first empirical study as an undergraduate (eventually published as Kunert & Scheepers, 2014). Back then, I used a 25 minute long dyslexia screening test to distinguish dyslexic participants from non-dyslexic participants (the Lucid Adult Dyslexia Screener). Even though previous studies had suggested an excellent sensitivity (identifying actually dyslexic readers as dyslexic) of 90% and a moderate to excellent specificity (identifying actually non-dylexic readers as non-dyslexic) of 66% – 91% (Singleton et al., 2009; Nichols et al., 2009), my own values were worse at 61% sensitivity and 65% specificity. In other words, the dyslexia test only flagged someone with an official dyslexia diagnosis in 11/18 cases and only categorised someone without known reading problems as non-dyslexic in 13/20 cases. The dyslexia screener didn’t perform exactly as suggested by the published literature and I have been suspicious of ability tests every since.

Five years later I acquired data to look at how music can influence language processing (Kunert et al., 2016) and added a newly proposed music abilitily measure called PROMS (Law & Zentner, 2012) to the experimental sessions to see how bad it is. I really thought I would see the music listening ability scores derived from the PROMS to be conflated with things which on the face of it have little to do with music (digit span, i.e. the ability to repeat increasingly longer digit sequences), because previous music ability tests had that problem. Similarly, I expected people with better music training to not have that much better PROMS scores. In other words, I expected the PROMS to perform worse than suggested by the people who developed the test, in line with my negative experience with the dylexia screener.

It then came as a surprise to see that PROMS scores were hardly associated with the ability to repeat increasingly longer digit sequences (either in the same order, i.e. forward digit span, or in reverse order, i.e. backward digit span), see Figure 1A and 1B. This makes the PROMS scores surprisingly robust against variation in working memory, as you would expect from a good music ability test.

journal.pone.0159103.g002

Figure 1. How the brief PROMS (vertical axis) correlates with various validity measures (horizontal axis). Each dot is one participant. Lines are best fit lines with equal weights for each participant (dark) or downweighting unusual participants (light). Inserted correlation values reflect dark line (Pearson r) or a rank-order equivalent of it which is robust to outliers (Spearman rho). Correlation values range from -1 to +1.

The second surprise came when musical training was actually associated with better music skill scores, as one would expect for a good test of music skills, see Figures 1C, 1D, 1E, and 1H. To top it of, the PROMS score was also correlated with the music task performance in the experiment looking at how language influences music processing. This association between the PROMS and musical task accuracy was visible in two independent samples, see Figures 1F and 1G, which is truly surprising because the music task targets harmonic music perception which is not directly tested by the PROMS.

To conclude, I can honestly recommend the PROMS to music researchers. To my surprise it is a good test which could truly tell us something about where music skills actually come from. I’m glad that this time I have been proven wrong regarding my suspicions about ability tests.

— — —

Kunert R, & Scheepers C (2014). Speed and accuracy of dyslexic versus typical word recognition: an eye-movement investigation. Frontiers in psychology, 5 PMID: 25346708

Kunert R, Willems RM, & Hagoort P (2016). Language influences music harmony perception: effects of shared syntactic integration resources beyond attention. Royal Society open science, 3 (2) PMID: 26998339

Kunert R, Willems RM, & Hagoort P (2016). An Independent Psychometric Evaluation of the PROMS Measure of Music Perception Skills. PloS one, 11 (7) PMID: 27398805

Law LN, & Zentner M (2012). Assessing musical abilities objectively: construction and validation of the profile of music perception skills. PloS one, 7 (12) PMID: 23285071

Nichols SA, McLeod JS, Holder RL, & McLeod HS (2009). Screening for dyslexia, dyspraxia and Meares-Irlen syndrome in higher education. Dyslexia, 15 (1), 42-60 PMID: 19089876

Singleton, C., Horne, J., & Simmons, F. (2009). Computerised screening for dyslexia in adults Journal of Research in Reading, 32 (1), 137-152 DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9817.2008.01386.x
— — —

2 comments

  1. Hey. Can you point me in the direction of where you took this test? I’ve tried to use the one on the York Uni website and whilst the questions load, the picture/sound elements don’t. Thanks, Chris.

    1. Hi Chris.

      Thanks for your comment.

      I contacted the authors (Zentner to be precise) to receive the test for research purposes. They should be able to fix the loading problem.

      Best,

      Richard

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s